Category: Blog Post

A road bend to the right and out of frame. It is deliberately littered with stones, bricks, and large tree branches by students as a way of restricting vehicle access to the university campus during a strike.

That’s Enough about Tim Ingold!: A Millennial’s Response

[This post is adapted and updated from a paper presented at the University of Colorado, Boulder graduate student conference, “The Ethnographic Turn” in 2016. I am indebted to Audra Simpson for her thoughtful feedback. The text is accompanied by embedded Instagram photographs from my ongoing dissertation research.] Multimodal Ramadan. Medina, Dakar, #Senegal. 2017. Olympus EM10ii. ...

Processing Settler Toxicities: Part II

This second instalment of a  2+ part post is adapted from a presentation at the 2018 Cultures of Energy Symposium at Rice University. Many thanks to everyone who responded to my call for entries into the Indigenous Studies Glossary. Gunalchéesh also to Kristen Simmons and Teresa Montoya for thinking with me for this panel, for ...

Processing Settler Toxicities: Part I

This 2+ part post is adapted from a presentation at the 2018 Cultures of Energy Symposium at Rice University. Many thanks to everyone who responded to my call for entries into the Indigenous Studies Glossary. Gunalchéesh also to Kristen Simmons and Teresa Montoya for thinking with me for this panel, for your brilliant anger and ...

Diasporic Fields of Belonging

I collect stories about U.S. anthropology graduate training experience from racially minoritized individuals across color lines and borders. I document these narratives emerging from this broad collective and yet dispersed diasporic group in a hope to find collaborative strategies for equitable anthropology graduate training. I do so through via web-video interviews (such as Skype and ...

Something to Shoot For

A note for the reader:  I had the idea to attend a gun show and doing some writing about it a while ago, but the appeal of it faded relatively quickly. I filed it away as an idea that seemed good, but that I didn’t feel like I had the energy to actually follow through ...

Black and white photo of graffiti on a wall that reads "Soyez réaliste, demandez l'impossible," one of the many slogans of the May 1968 student/worker strike in France. It means, "Be a realist. Demand the impossible."

This is unsettling; this is our discipline.

[This article was co-authored by Dick Powis and Savannah Martin. Please cite accordingly.] Today, we are proud to launch Footnotes, a group blog by and for anthropology and anthro-adjacent scholars who want to advance anthropology, what it can do, what it means, and who can participate in it. It is thrilling to join 20 incredible ...